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of a broader counterrevolutionary force led by the british, then the united states seem to recognize the soviets in 1933 under roosevelt. then during the '30s, the soviet union was pushing very hard for international consensus in trying to stop hitler. the anti-fascist forces globally and the commons party was -- as a result of that. but then during the war, after germany attacked the soviet union in 1941, then the united states and the british decide they will support the soviet union because, to bring the service can keep the soviets in the war. the soviets were caught so offguard that the british were concerned that the service would think -- capitulates at the moment. the united states offer several things. the soviets make several demands. the united states promises matÉriel and has a hard time living there for a number of reasons. in the first couple of years. stalin said if you give us the airplanes and other equipment that we need, the united states tries to roosevelt makes an effort. other people are not as quite sincere in providing. the soviets second and, they wanted som
withdrawal, in which she called for the united states to remove all of its troops immediately. that was an extremely radical position, even into the early 70's. but howard argued it privately. to my mind it is one of the two or three best of his books. certainly it was a clarion call because nobody else and are you case so brilliantly. >> one of the more controversial episodes is a trip that howard made to north vietnam along with dan, very fans peace activist. he talked a little bit about how that came together and what happened? >> it was the result of another very well known peace activist at the time. call howard and said that fit the north vietnamese leaders had alerted he in the league in that they were willing to release three american pilots who had been captured but wanted to release them into the hands of peace initiatives, and not enter prison this from the u.s. hear the. and so hard was asked to go with them very in tune errors said, when. he said, tomorrow morning. he left the next morning. there was a little bit of conflict over how the pows were being released i
.o.w. was being released and to get back to the united states. what happened there? >> guest: it had been how word and dan's understanding that the pilots would come home and drive the commercial planes and the u.s. government insisted on using the government plans which outraged not only howard and a ban but also the resist and everybody had been involved in that operation. there was a lot of criticism for this trip. many people seem to think that he was basically acting as a stooge for the communist north vietnam. how did they respond to some of the criticisms coming out? >> guest: no way he responded to all criticisms in regard to his entire war stance, this is an evil war. we should never have been there in the first place. we are doing roofless horrible things, killing multitudes of people. though war has to be ended and any jester we can make to that end we want to go on making. estimate his political activity would go on throughout his life in the solidarity being impressed by the regime's and the opposition to apartheid fairly soon he would be most famous for his writing for his history th
called "vietnam: the logic of withdrawal" in which he called for the united states to remove all of its troops immediately. that was an extremely radical position even into the early '70s. but howard argued it brilliant brilliantly. to my mind, it's one of the two or three best of howard's books. and certainly was a clarion call at the time. because nobody else had argued the case so brilliantly as howard did in that book. >> host: one of the more controversial episodes during the war that you talk about in the book is a trip that howard made to north vietnam along with dan barrigan, a very famous peace activist from the '60s. can you talk a little bit about how that came together and what happened with this trip he made? >> guest: yes. it was the result of dave dalinger who was another very well known peace activist at the time. he called howard and said that the north vietnamese leadership had alerted him of the war resisters' league that they were willing to release three american pilots who had been captured, but they wanted to release them into the hands of peace negotiators, not i
as people from other parts of the united states. this was the first time african-american performers have performed on the same stage in a play in china. >> host: so you, a historian, makes history. >> guest: it was historic. and then once i did in china, while, where else? where else? i've taken an interest. i gone to the palestinian territories back in the '90s, because the role of nonviolence their, they need to bring nonviolence into this dispute between the israelis and the palestinians. and i thought why not bring it there? and again, this was the palestinian national theatre taking on display. they targeted at different communities. not just played it in jerusalem. east jerusalem. all these different -- >> host: what was their reaction put your bringing again protesters, a story of martin luther king. >> guest: i asked permission. >> host: did you have to have a? >> guest: not really. i think we had a little trouble getting in, but once we got into israel, coming to israel and into jerusalem, and i'm sure they could have shut it down if they had wanted to. >> host: in this corner o
? >> guest: that's correct. >> host: what does the chief justice of the united states doing an import into volume rent is and then his chronology. >> guest: the chief has two roles in the judicial system. he serves the chief amount among amount equal is on he finds the opinion in the majority. he leads a discussion that conference. so he is an important role to play among the nine justices and he's the key guide hair. particularly when he's in the majority. but the other thing that rehnquist was an achieved is really ahead of the entire administrative office of the u.s. courts. runs the entire court system and that's a low part of administrative responsibility at the other justices don't have. but that's a chief justice does. >> let's go back to the beginning. born october 1st around this time of the 1924. his father was a paper sales and another was a homemaker, but she was the dominant force in the household, right? talk a little bit about mrs. rehnquist in a little bit about how she got him to change his middle name, which was what got change the course of his life. >> guest: well,
to the religion of the united states this certainly demand for a very evangelical biblical world in our politics and they find plenty of evidence to prove it. the founder on the left says the law of the founding fathers were like thinkers and fought that religion had no place in our society, and that is just inaccurate. those are competing founders, competing collectivization of the founding generation coming and they are equally inaccurate i think. >> host: let's talk about taxes. published in 2012 that talks about a grover norquist and james madison. so, how and when it comes to the issue of texas or taxes with representation. they revolted a few times and our shays' rebellion, the whiskey rebellion, there were -- there was quite a bit of anti-tax sentiment in america. that said, the constitution is virtually unlimited in the taxing power that it gives to the government, and hamilton road 30 through 35 about the need to collect taxes and there are a number of places that says i think very straightforward that doesn't make it into the glenn beck version that says it is politically difficult to
fathers is particularly dangerous because, as i say so often in the book, they were not a collective unit, and presenting them as such tends to dramatically oversimply identify the politics of the founding generation. then it comes to be used as a big battering ram to beat people over the head with in ways i think are historically incorrect and rhetorically unsound. >> host: who in america's right wing are we talking about? sunny started with glen beck. i determined i was going to write this book about 15 minutes after i ran into glen beck's translation of the federalist papers, the original argument, and it was in our supermarket, our krogers, in wichita, and i went around and said to people, can you believe this? glen beck has translated the federalist papers? and almost everybody said, and what's wrong with that. i said, well, they're in english. they don't need to be translated. people didn't understand why i was so upset about this. this really kind of ticked me off. so that was the first book i read, was the glen beck's translation of i think 33, 34 of the federalist papers with a l
a particular denomination of protestantism to be the controlling religion of the united states but certainly they meant for a very evangelical, biblical world to culminate in our politics. they find plenty of evidence to prove that. the founders find on the left that all the founding fathers were deists and they didn't leave much in god. they were enlightened thinkers and they thought that religion has no place in our society. that is just as inaccurate. those are competing collectivization of the founding generation and they are equally inaccurate i think. >> host: and let's talk about taxes. this might be the only book published in 2012 the talks about grover norquist and james madison. when it comes to the issue of taxes and what role the government has in taxing the population and using the revenues it raises, what is the history from the 18 century and how has the right-wing use that history today? >> guest: well, americans have never liked taxes. they didn't like taxes without representation. they didn't like taxation with representation. they revolted a few times in the shea rebellion
at the fanatics and he said restricted at the united states. restricted at us for supporting our country and a government that is at times forced to adopt costs and even conflicting policies in a complicated world. of all schools as much of the same. if you happen to be conservative and you ever want to increase your status as a minority conservative, you should hang out in cambridge massachusetts for a while. there is more anti-american is floating around in the red sox were the socks jersey's. it was in favor of the war in iraq and that was a pariah. while in law school and other interesting thing happened. in one of my summers in new york while i was out one night with friends drinking and playing a pool the topic of the politics came up, and one of my friends whose politics i was not acquainted with instructed me to get the conversation explaining how she doesn't like to talk politics with friends because they always end up offended. so i thought about that statement for the second. then i realized that in new york a few or offending people, as i sometimes tend to do, you must be rep
the waves and democrats are the next generation. we've always had some people who see the united states primarily in compact with each other and other people who see it as a union and the state administrative districts union. the idea that the founders had a coherent position about state rights, the dolphins have the same thing requires you to pretend we didn't have elections back then because that's what their actions for about. different parties wanted different things. i think that generally the southerners were more confederated. they savas morrisey compact states. the northerners were more a nation. hamilton was almost a monarchists. i mean, hamilton saw this very much as a union. i think that there was about the founders the founders a strong belief. when i read that texas is trying to secede from the union because they're not about some recent political event, that just strikes me as terrifically tragic in a comic sort of way because the founding generation -- or worry about if unions, but not supporters of the constitution. host robert terry, andrew napolitano, what do they have
might not like it. it's not -- the world, despite what people think, the united states is not full of people running up celt cards and running to the bankruptcy courts. the united states is full of a lot of people who live in an uncertain society who are stuck with huge health care expenses, lose their jobs, their families fall apart, and they run up debts. they start small businesses, another huge source of debt, and, in fact, we have evidence to show people who start small businesses and freelancers end up in bankruptcy court more than people who have regular, corporate jobs. when i looked at this, i spoke to people who, you know, put out a picture to follow daand success people and people who paid down debts, and i found people who, in one case, somebody was still hundreds of thousands of dollars in debt. he was an airline pilot, earned what he would have earned in 1991, the salaries frozen for years. most of the debt came from an ill-timed home renovation before the salary was cut, and then he and his wife started a small business, and what happens to most small businesses happ
are not staying at home. .. a they have so a few men to start with. then they have to use units. they are constantly deploying troops to prevent slaves from running away to the enemy and joining the union army. they also have to divert troops to contain the deserters. they don't have any extra troops, so the pressure on them on numbers by the end by late 1864, by 1863 the secretary of war said there are no more white men to be had. and at that point, the conversation starts seriously about whether they have to use black soldiers. it's bizarre but i think the perfect arc of justice from slavery as an element of strength to, we have to consider emancipating the slaves to force them to enlist in the confederacy. so that is another story i tell in the book. they don't contemplate emancipation out of the goodness of their heart. a lot of people think that the confederacy chose independence over slavery because by the end, some people were willing to enlist slaves in the army but the confederate congress and the virginia legislature refused to write in emancipation clause. they actual
to come and work with the greatest theater company as well as people from other parts of the united states because this is the first time african-american performers had performed on the same stage in a play in china. once i did it in china i thought well, what else? i had taken the interest and had gone to the palestinian territories back in the 90's because of the way of nonviolence and the need to bring on violence and to this dispute between the israelis and the palestinians. and i thought why not bring it to their? this was the palestinian national theater taking on this play and they to get to eight different communities, not just in jerusalem, and east jerusalem and in all these different -- >> host: what was the reaction from the government? you are bringing again protestors in the story. would you like to have it? >> guest: we had a little bit of trouble getting in but once we got into israel coming to israel and jerusalem they chose not to oppose it to a i'm sure that they had shut it down if they wanted to >> host: the word terrorism as always mentioned. here you found the inter
other parts of the united states because this was the first time african-american performers had performed on the same stage in a play in china. >> host: sent you a historian makes history. >> guest: it was historic and then we also did it in china. i'd take in the interest and had gone to the palestinian territories back in the 90's because the role of non-violence, the need to bring on violence and to this dispute between the palestinians and i thought why not bring it thwacks and again this was the palestinian national theater and taking on this play we took it to eight different communities not just voted in jerusalem and east jerusalem but ramallah and all these different -- >> host: what was the reaction on the government? again, bringing protestors in the story -- >> guest: i didn't ask the permission. >> host: did you have to have it? >> guest: not really. we had a little bit of trouble getting in, but once we got into israel and coming through israel into jerusalem it was not to oppose it. i'm sure they could have shut it down if they wanted to. >> host: we always hear o
to declare bankruptcy united states is not full of people who are running up their credit cards and then run into bankruptcy court. it is full of a lot of people who live in a very uncertain and society with huge health care expenses, lose their jobs, families fall apart. they start small businesses which is another huge source of debt. pinchot's those people show up in bankruptcy court more often. so i spoke to people and put out a request for those who follow gave ramsey and people who said they paid down their debt and in one case somebody was to hundreds of thousands of dollars in debt, an airline pilot earning what he would have burned 1991 most of his debt came from before the ill-timed home renovation then they tried to better their position and started a small business and what happened is they ended up with more debt. you try not to interject and try to be a reporter i finally said why don't you declare bankruptcy? he said dave says not to. i could not believe it would help this person not to declare bankruptcy. if he was he would damage his retirement prospect and childrens' colleg
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16